Noise pollution

Surely, the first time I heard the phrase “noise pollution” was in elementary school.  As a phrase I grew up with, I never gave it much thought.  And my single thought about it was “noise pollution is unwanted human-generated noise that disrupts our quiet enjoyment of our environment.”

It turns out, as we learn in this TED Talk, that noise pollution is a real problem for the natural environment.

Photos: Blue Ribbon Bastards, Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Blue Ribbon Bastards at Mohawk Place, Buffalo, NY, Aug. 22, 2015

Photos: A night a Buddy Guy’s Legends night club in Chicago with the Kinsey Report

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In Chicago for the first-ever LION Publishers Conference at Columbia University and I realized that this was my seventh visit to Chicago (if I’m counting right) and I’ve never been to a blues club. What brought this to my attention is that Buddy Guy’s Legends club is near my hotel.  Last night, a group of us LIONs went out to dinner and and then to Legends.

Dinner was at Quartino Ristorante. Good food, but perhaps the highlight of the night was the bathroom attendant.  When I walked in the men’s room, the smartly dressed attended was dancing to the some blues music.  I told him that we were going to Buddy Guy’s place later.  He told me he grew up with Buddy Guy’s kids.  He told me he knew Greg Guy really well and said that if I told Greg I knew Theop, I wouldn’t have to pay the cover charge.

Naturally, I took that with a grain of salt.

But when I mentioned my little encounter with Theop to the security guy who was standing next to the mixing booth, he said, “this is Greg right here.”  So I met Greg Guy.  He is in fact long-time friends with Theop.   Greg was really nice — we spoke a little bit more through the course of the evening.  Near the end of the night, Greg jammed with the Kinsey Report.  (I didn’t ask to waive the cover charge — I was very happy that they let me bring my camera in with me.  The only restriction was, no long lens.  But by the end of the night, they were letting me use my 70-200mm lens).

The Kinsey Report was an outstanding band.  Super tight. Great chops all the way around.  The band is from Gary, Ind., and is comprised of Donald Kinsey, Ralph Kinsey, Kenneth Kinsey and Nic Byrd.

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‘Lede’ vs. ‘Lead’

Early in my career somebody I obviously respected — can’t remember who now — told me the correct newspaper spelling of the opening of a newspaper story is “lede.”

There’s lot of romanticism and nostalgia in the newspaper industry for “lede,” like there is for “–30–.”

journalism booksHell, there’s romanticism of the literal kind around the spelling of “lede” in my own life. When Billie and I were first dating, the shared knowledge that the word is correctly spelled “lede” was just one more way we bonded.

But we were wrong.

The other thing that Billie and I shared was a love of old journalism books. Before we met, with both collected them. Today, our collection exceeds 400 titles. About 100 of the best of them are sitting at the moment immediately to my left.

Some years ago, researching the evolution of “objective journalism,” I cracked open many of these old books, and something struck me — in none of these old books did any author spell the word “lede.” They all spell it “lead.”

It was then I realized, there is no historic basis for the spelling of a lead as “lede.” “Lede” is an invention of linotype romanticists, not something used in newsrooms of the linotype era.

It’s really emblematic of today’s print nostalgia, too — like Desi and Lucy sleeping in separate beds — a longing for an America that never was, or wasn’t quite what you thought it was.

Here are some sources for you:

The fact is, in none of the dozens of old journalism books that I have examined — none of them — spell it “lede.” I can’t find the definitive first reference to “lede” but it doesn’t start appearing in journalism books until the 1980s.

The discussion about “lede” vs. “lead” on Twitter this morning seems to have been sparked by a post from Jay Rosen, on the “the best lede ever.”

I’m not sure where the conversation went from there. By the time I jumped in, Steve Buttry, Steve Yelvington and others had weighed in. (Hash Tags weren’t used, so hard to point you to the entire thread).

The explanation for “lede” was offered up as an alternate spelling for “lead” (pronounced “led” as in “hot lead” or “hot type.”) of the linotype era.

However, as the sources I cite demonstrate, journalists working in the linotype era (which started in 1896) never spelled it “lede.” It was always “lead,” as in “news lead.”

It wasn’t until linotype was disappearing from newsrooms across the nation (late 1970s and into the 1980s), that we start seeing the spelling “lede.”

The safest conclusion, then, is that “lede” is a romantic fiction invented by those who were nostalgic for the passing of the linotype era.

UPDATE: Chris Keller used Storify to aggregate and organize this morning’s Twitter conversation.

UPDATE Aug. 13, 2019: Roy Peter Clark — who is going to question RPC on journalism writing? — did his own research and came to pretty much the same conclusion, added extensive quotes to his essay, and concluded with the very good point: A good lead is crafted in the service of great writing, and if the writing is good, that’s is all that matters. Thank you to Roy for the citation of this piece in his article.